ITEM

DESCRIPTION

PRICE

Scarce double signed both front and back view of Winfield Scott by Fredericks. 

$600

View of General John Geary XII Corps by Lemur of Harrisburg Pa.  Suspension ribbon at top. 

$200

Brady cdv of Union Soldiers lounging around near the Georgetown Aqueduct.  Scarce view. 

$250

Rare view of Future President of the US James Garfield by Photographer E Decker of Cleveland Ohio.  First local image of Garfield I have ever seen.

$550

Brady Album Gallery Card cut down to CDV size of Union General French outside of his tent with US Flag.  Great view. 

$550

Anthony view of General Israel Richardson mortally wounded at Antietam.  

$250

Rare view of General Abram Duryee in his pre-war 7th NYSM Uniform with badges by Anthony. 

$350

Anthony view of William T Sherman.

$200

CDV of General George Gordon Meade by Millis. 

$200

Rare view of Boy General Wesley Merritt by Goldin Washington.  Promoted to General along with Custer and Farnsworth he went on to a long and noted career in the Army.  

$400

General Thomas Sweeny by Abbott NY.  “

Thomas William Sweeny (December 25, 1820 – April 10, 1892) was an Irish-American soldier who served in the Mexican–American War and then was a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War.  Birth and early years.  Sweeny was born in Cork, Ireland, on Christmas Day, 1820. He immigrated to the United States in 1833. In 1846, he enlisted as a second lieutenant in the 2nd New York Volunteers, and fought under General Winfield Scott in Mexico. Sweeny was wounded in the groin at the Battle of Cerro Gordo, and his right arm was so badly injured at the Battle of Churubusco that it had to be amputated. For his heroics, his fellow servicemen nicknamed him “Fighting Tom”. Despite this possibly career-ending injury, he continued serving with the 2nd US Infantry until the outbreak of the Civil War. Sweeny was active in the Yuma War (1850–1853), fighting in several engagements against native Americans.  Civil War
At the outbreak of the Civil War, Sweeny was in command of the arsenal at St. Louis, Missouri. In reply to efforts of Confederate sympathizers to induce him to surrender that important post, he declared that before he would do so, he would blow it up. As second in command, he participated in the capture of Camp Jackson in May 1861 and later assisted in organizing the Home Guards. He was chosen as the brigadier general of that organization.  Sweeny commanded the Fifty-second Illinois at Fort Donelson. At Shiloh, in command of a brigade, he successfully defended a gap in the Union line. He was wounded in the battle having received two shots in his only remaining arm and a shot in one of his legs.[2] Sweeny kept the field until the close of the fight, exciting the admiration of the whole army. He returned to command his regiment but returned to brigade command when General Pleasant A. Hackleman was killed at Corinth. He commanded the Second Division of the Sixteenth Army Corps in the Atlanta campaign. At the Battle of Atlanta Sweeny’s division intercepted John B. Hood’s flank attack. Sweeny got into a fistfight with his corps commander, General Grenville M. Dodge, when Dodge broke protocol and personally directed one of Sweeny’s brigades during the fight. Sweeny received a court-martial for these actions but was acquitted. He mustered out of the volunteers in August 1865, and was dismissed for going AWOL by the end of the year.  Fenian raids
In 1866, he commanded the ill-fated Fenian invasion of Canada, after which he was arrested for breaking neutrality laws between the United States and Britain, but was soon released. He was reinstated with his former rank of major later that year, and retired from the Regular Army in May 1870 as a brigadier general.  Death  Sweeny retired to Astoria on Long Island. He died there on April 10, 1892, and is buried in Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn.

$400


Important CDV of Private Frank Brownell of the 11th New York Fire Zouaves who
were commanded by Colonel Ellsworth, the personal friend of Abraham Lincoln.
When Ellsworth was killed by Marshall, the proprietor of the Marshall House in
Alexandria after pulling down his Confederate Flag he was flying, Brownell killed
Marshall by bayoneting him in the stairwell. Brownell is show standing on the same
Confederate Flag from the incident at the start of the Civil War. Shown in full
Zouave uniform by Anthony/Brady with a great period inscription on the verso
“Brownell. He who killed the Jackson the murderer of Ellsworth”. Sharp image.

$750

View of General George Hartsuff and two staff members by Brady.  One of the officers is his brother and there is a period inscription on the verso of the image. 

$275

Rare pose of Senator and Colonel Edward Baker of Oregon.  Killed at the battle of Balls Bluff Va in 1861.

$300

Spectacular view of Amputee Timothy Green of the 36th NYVI with history on the verso of the image.   Green was wounded at Malvern Hill in 1862 which resulted in the amputation of his leg as seen.  

$1200

New” Edwin Henry Stoughton (June 23, 1838 – December 25, 1868), was appointed a brigadier general in the Union Army during the American Civil War but his appointment expired after it was not confirmed by the U.S. Senate. Four days later, on March 8, 1863, he was captured by Confederate partisan ranger John S. Mosby while asleep at his headquarters in the Virginia village of Fairfax Court House. The incident became well known and Stoughton became an object of ridicule as a result. He was included in a prisoner exchange two months later, but resigned his commission after he was not reappointed as a brigadier general.  Stoughton.  Stoughton was appointed a cadet at the U.S. Military Academy on July 1, 1854, and graduated with the class of 1859. He served garrison duty as a brevet second lieutenant in the 4th U.S. Infantry from July to September 1859. He was promoted to second lieutenant, and transferred to the 6th U.S. Infantry.  Stoughton during the civil war
Stoughton resigned his regular commission in March 1861, and in September was appointed commander of the 4th Vermont Infantry with the rank of colonel. He was only 23 at the time of his appointment, and said to be the youngest colonel in the army.[4] He led his command in the Peninsula Campaign, and his effective performance led to his selection for promotion and command of a brigade.  In November 1862, he was appointed brigadier general of Volunteers, and he assumed command of the 2nd Vermont Brigade on December 7, replacing Colonel Asa P. Blunt. Stoughton’s brother, Charles B. Stoughton, assumed command of the 4th Vermont Infantry in his stead. Stoughton’s appointment was never confirmed by the U.S. Senate and it expired March 4, 1863, less than a week before Mosby’s Fairfax Court House Raid.  Mosby’s Rangers (led by Confederate officer John S. Mosby) led a daring raid into Union Territory and captured Stoughton at Fairfax Court House on March 9, 1863. Stoughton had hosted a party for his visiting mother and sister, who were staying at the home of Confederate spy Antonia Ford. After leaving the party, Stoughton retired to a nearby house that served as his headquarters. Mosby allegedly found Stoughton in bed, supposedly rousing him with a slap to his rear. Upon being so rudely awakened, the general shouted, “Do you know who I am?” Mosby quickly replied, “Do you know Mosby, general?” “Yes! Have you got the rascal?” “No but he has got you!” In his own written account of Stoughton’s capture, which appeared in Volume III of 1888’s Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, Mosby did not mention the supposed “spanking” incident.[6] It is however mentioned in Mosby’s Memoirs.  Allegedly, Stoughton was not popular with the officers and men of the brigade, and few mourned his loss. U.S. President Lincoln, on hearing of the capture, said that “he did not so much mind the loss of a brigadier general, for he could make another in five minutes; ‘but those horses cost $125 apiece!'”[8] Blunt resumed command, and led the brigade until he turned command over to Brigadier General George J. Stannard on April 20. Stannard led the brigade until the Battle of Gettysburg.After a two-month stay in Richmond’s Libby Prison, Stoughton was exchanged, but saw no further service. The U.S. Senate had not confirmed his initial appointment and he was not re-appointed. He resigned from the Union Army in May 1863 and moved to New York.  Stoughton as depicted in 1911’s Prison Life in the Old Capitol and Reminiscences of the Civil War.
Stoughton was an attorney in New York City after the war, practicing with his father and with his uncle, Edwin W. Stoughton. He died of tuberculosis in Dorchester, Massachusetts on December 25, 1868. He is buried at the Immanuel Cemetery at the Immanuel Episcopal Church in Bellows Falls, Vermont. The Grand Army of the Republic post in Bellows Falls was named for him.[9]

$400

“New”  Sharp view of General Thomas Francis Meagher head of the Irish Brigade by Anthony/Brady. 

$500

New”  CDV of Sargent John F Kirkwood 10th Maryland Volunteers with album page and id.  Image is trimmed.  Generally Maryland images are relatively rare.  Nice view. 

$175

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