ITEM

DESCRIPTION

PRICE

On Hold

Brady Gallery Card image of the Bridge over the Hazel River, a tributary of the Rappahannock in VA.

$450

Brady Gallery Card image of the Union Wounded being treated by Surgeons from the Battle of Savage Station on 6/27/62 during the Peninsula campaign in 1862.  Some slight damage in upper left away from the action. 

$550

Brady Gallery Card image of Confederate Dead in the Sunken Road at Antietam.  These are men of Gordon’s Brigade who fought the Irish Brigade and paid the ultimate price.  Rare and important.

$1500

Brady Gallery Card image of Smith’s Barn near Keedysville Md used as a Hospital by the Union after the Battle of Antietam. 

$450

Very Rare cdv sized albumen of General Thomas Egan, 40th NYVI.  “Egan joined the 40th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment, called the Mozart Regiment, in April 1861 at the beginning of the Civil War, as a private.[2] (The regiment was sponsored by the Democratic Party’s Mozart Hall Committee.)[3] Egan was made lieutenant colonel on June 14, 1861.  Lieutenant Colonel Egan participated in most of the major battles of the Army of the Potomac. Initially, the Mozart Regiment served in first division III Corps. Col. Egan is reported to have arrested the colonel of the regiment for misconduct at the Battle of Fair Oaks in May 1862.[4] In June 1862, Egan was promoted to the rank of colonel. He led the regiment at the Second Battle of Bull Run, the Battle of Chantilly and the Battle of Chancellorsville. At Chancellorsville, Colonel Egan became acting commander of first brigade first division III Corps, when Brigadier General Charles K. Graham was assigned to command of the third division following the death of Major General Amiel W. Whipple. At the Battle of Gettysburg on July 2, 1863, Colonel Egan, once more leading his regiment, was wounded in action near Devil’s Den, being hit in a leg; and the regiment’s monument stands near that site. [1] The Mozart Regiment lost 150 of 431 troops engaged.[5] Egan also led the Mozart Regiment in the Mine Run Campaign during the autumn of 1863.  Just before Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant’s Overland Campaign of 1864, III Corps was dissolved. First division became third division II Corps. Egan led his regiment in the Battle of the Wilderness.[6] He became commander of a brigade during the Battle of Spotsylvania, after Brigadier General J. H. Hobart Ward was relieved for drunkenness on the night of May 12, 1864. His command was involved in a counterattack against the Confederates during the fighting at Harris Farm.[7] Egan led the brigade at the Battle of North Anna, attacking Henagan’s Redoubt.[8] He also led it at the Battle of Cold Harbor. Egan was wounded during the Second Battle of Petersburg in June 1864, suffering slight paralysis as a result.  Colonel Egan received his commission as brigadier general on September 3, 1864. (Secretary of War Edwin Stanton personally handed him his commission.)[4][10] At the Battle of Boydton Plank Road on October 27, he commanded the second division II Corps in place of Brigadier General John Gibbon. Egan was seriously wounded on November 14, 1864. The wound disabled his right arm.[9] On recovering, he was given a division in the Army of the Shenandoah on the request of Major General Winfield Scott Hancock. On December 12, 1864, President Abraham Lincoln nominated Egan for appointment to the brevet grade of major general of volunteers to rank from October 27, 1864 for his service at the Battle of Boydton Plank Road, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the nomination on February 14, 1865

$Sold

Ultra Rare view of General Earl Van Dorn in Uniform. 850

On Hold

Very Sharp view of J E B Stuart by Gurney. 

$350

Rare cdv of Confederate General John M Jones, Wounded at Gettysburg.  “With the outbreak of the Civil War and Virginia’s secession, Jones resigned his commission in the United States Army on May 27, 1861 to enter the Confederate service as a captain of artillery. He was appointed a colonel of infantry and served in what became the Army of Northern Virginia. He participated as a staff officer in Stonewall Jackson’s Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1862, Front Royal, the Seven Days Battles, the Second Battle of Bull Run, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. In May, Jones was promoted to brigadier general in Edward “Allegheny” Johnson’s division to replace John R. Jones (not related). During Johnson’s assault on Culp’s Hill at Gettysburg, Jones suffered a severe wound to his thigh that put him out of action. Some sources say that it was a head wound, but in his official report, Jones cites extreme hemorrhaging of his thigh. In August, Robert E. Lee called Jones “a good commander” when he assigned him to lead the brigade vacated by William “Extra Billy” Smith, who had returned to Virginia as governor. Late in the year, Jones was wounded again during the Mine Run Campaign.  In the early days of the Overland Campaign of 1864, Jones was killed at the Wilderness while attempting to rally his wavering men. His brigade had taken a position on the south side of the Orange Turnpike. Shortly before 1:00 p.m., it was hit hard by Brig. General Joseph J. Bartlett’s V Corps brigade, which began pushing back the Confederates, many in disorder. Jones and his aide-de-camp Robert Early were killed while desperately trying to restore order. Jones’s body was eventually returned home and buried in Maplewood Cemetery in Charlottesville.  Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell wrote of Jones’s death in his official report on the Wilderness, “I considered his loss an irreparable one to his brigade.”  Jones’s sister was married to famed Confederate general A.P. Hill’s older brother Thomas.”

$900

2 cdv’s and the personal album of Dr AAC Williams, Chief Surgeon of the 2nd Berdan’s Sharpshooters, wounded at Chancellorsville, accompanied by his personal family album with Rare Thermoplastic Covers (first album of this type I have ever seen).  Both cdv’s have lengthy inscriptions in Dr Williams handwriting.  Dr Williams first served a short stint as Asst Surgeon 1st Maine Vols, before joining the 2nd SS Regiment.  Album may be of Swiss Mfg as one of the Plates has the Swiss Cross emblem on it.

$1800

Ultra rare view of an African American Cavalry soldier from the 1st Corps de Afrique Cavalry, later the 4th USCT Cavalry in New Orleans.  Photographer is Anderson of Camp St.  Shown standing with ornate kepi with 1 in crossed sabers and wearing his sword.  

$750

Scarce view of Union Cavalry General Alfred Gibbs by Brady.  Gibbs graduated from the United States Military Academy in the class of 1846, served and was twice wounded in the Mexican–American War and was wounded again by Apaches during frontier service in 1857. His pre-Civil War career was in cavalry service. During the Civil War, Gibbs commanded the only Union army volunteer regiment which was converted from an infantry regiment entirely to a cavalry regiment: The 130th New York Infantry converted to the 1st Regiment New York Dragoons.[1]After the conversion of Gibbs’s regiment to cavalry service in August 1863, he was frequently assigned to command a cavalry brigade and briefly to command a cavalry division. He only was appointed to brigadier general of volunteers to rank from the date of the Battle of Cedar Creek on October 19, 1864, and given permanent brigade command in December 1864. He received three brevet general awards for meritorious service in three key battles, Trevilian Station, Opequon or Third Winchester and Five Forks.[citation needed]As commander of an infantry regiment, Gibbs participated in the successful defense of Suffolk, Virginia and Norfolk, Virginia, in April and early May, 1863 when Confederate forces under Lt. Gen. James Longstreet tried to retake those key locations. He led his brigade or his regiment in major battles of the Overland Campaign and Maj. Gen. Sheridan’s raid which led to the Battle of Yellow Tavern. His brigade and division were detached from the Army of the Potomac soon after the beginning of the Siege of Petersburg to serve with Sheridan in all the battles of the Shenandoah Valley Campaigns of 1864. He and his brigade returned to Petersburg with Sheridan on March 26, 1865, and played a large part in the key battles of Dinwiddie Court House and Five Forks, which led to the breaking of the Confederate lines and the flight of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia under the command of General Robert E. Lee from Petersburg and Richmond, Virginia.  His brigade and division, under the command of Brig. Gen. Thomas C. Devin and the overall command of Maj. Gen. Sheridan joined in the pursuit of the Army of Northern Virginia in the ensuing Appomattox Campaign, and were engaged especially at the key Battle of Sayler’s Creek (sometimes shown as “Sailor’s Creek”). Gibbs was present at the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865.Gibbs remained in the Regular Army as a major in the 7th U.S. Cavalry after the war. He served as Post Commander of Fort Harker, Kansas, on four different occasions from January 1867 to December 1868. His previous service apparently had taken a toll on him because he died of “congestion of the brain” on December 26, 1868, aged 45.  Slight crease at lower left corner. 

$175

Interesting 1/6 plate TT of a Union Soldier from the 179th Infantry Co. D wearing a Hardee Hat.  Half case.

$175

CDV of the USS Black Hawk, Flagship of the Mississippi Squadron on the Red River.  The Black Hawk a large side wheeled steamer built in New Albany In.  Flagship for Admiral David D Porter during the War.  Ship accidently burned and sank near Cairo Il on 4/22/65.

$450

Scarce CDV of Colonel George B Bingham 1st Wisconsin Infantry by Webster of Louisville Ky.  Served from 4/61-10/64 rising from Captain to Colonel as he is viewed here.  Published image.

$400

CDV sized Tintype of a Union Corporal and friend.  Sharp view.  On the back someone placed the back of a cdv with the following written Uncle Arthur starved to death at Andersonville Prison Civil War.  Unfortunately no idea who uncle Arthur is.  

$275

Large US Grant Autograph dated 1868 as General of the Army on an album page.  Size overall is 5 by 8 inch.  Great autograph of the General and President.

$950

Wonderful large part document from Chattanooga HQ 14th Army Corps Nov 7 1863 signed by Generals Lovell Roussau and George Thomas “The Rock of Chickamauga”.  Document is right after the Battle of Chickamauga which forced the Army of the Cumberland to retreat to Chattanooga and just prior to the attack on Missionary Ridge which Thomas led.  Great historical piece of this critical time in the Civil War. 

$550

Interesting 1862 Document ALS in the hand of General Rufus Ingalls who would become the Chief QM for the Army of the Potomac later in the War.  Document pertains to the service for the Union Army of the Vessel Schooner William Caper? which probably ferried troops to the Peninsula in 1862.

$375

Small grouping I have had in my collection for years.  Wonderful pair of 1st Lt Shoulder straps accompanied by 3 Cuff buttons from a Union Uniform.  

$550

Albert Gallatin Jenkins (November 10, 1830 – May 21, 1864) was a Virginia attorney, planter, slaveholder, politician and soldier from what would become West Virginia during the American Civil War. He served in the United States Congress and later the First Confederate Congress. After Virginia’s secession, Jenkins raised a company of partisan rangers and rose to become a Confederate brigadier general, commanding a brigade of cavalry. Wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg and again during the Confederate loss at the Battle of Cloyd’s Mountain (during which he was captured), Jenkins died days after his arm was amputated by Union surgeons. His former home is now operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

$450

Robert Houstoun Anderson (October 1, 1835 – February 8, 1888) was a West Point graduate, an infantry officer in the United States Army and later served as a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War, After the war he served as the Chief of the Police for the city of Savannah for 23 years and was twice appointed to serve on the Visitor’s Board of the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, NY. He played an important role with reunification efforts after the war.  In March 1861, shortly before the official secession of his home state, Anderson left the US Army and accepted a commission as a lieutenant of artillery in the Confederate Army, formally resigning his U.S. Army commission on May 17, 1861.  In September 1861 he was promoted to the rank of Major, and was acting adjutant general of the troops on the Georgia coast. Anderson was then appointed assistant adjutant general to Maj. Gen. W. H. T. Walker of the Georgia State militia located in Pensacola, Florida. When Walker’s brigade was transferred to Virginia to join the Army of Northern Virginia in July 1861, Anderson went with him.  After Walker resigned, Anderson remained in Confederate service and was promoted to the rank of Major. In April 1862 Major Anderson formed the 1st Georgia Sharpshooter Battalion, and quickly built them into an effective and disciplined unit. The battalion was mustered at Camp Anderson, on the banks of the Ogeechee River. In early 1863 he and was placed in command of nearby Fort McAllister,[4] located just downriver from Savannah, Georgia to help slow the advancing Union ironclads. Fort McAllister was one of the key forts defending the port of Savannah, and would become the biggest obstacle in Sherman’s March to the Sea. Anderson was promoted to colonel and being placed in command of the 5th Georgia Cavalry.[1] on January 20, 1863.[2] He led Confederate defenses at the Battle of Fort McAllister (1863). General P. G. T. Beauregard in his official report to the war department, commended very highly the conduct of officers and men engaged in the successful defense of Fort McAllister in February 1863.  Anderson and the 5th Georgia Cavalry were transferred to the Army of Tennessee under General William W. Allen as part of Kelly’s Division, under General Joseph Wheeler before the opening of the Atlanta Campaign. Anderson earned a battlefield promotion to brigadier general of Cavalry on July 26, 1864. He was wounded at the Battle of Brown’s Mill near Newnan, Georgia on July 30, 1864 during the Atlanta Campaign. He rejoined his command at Briar Creek, fighting with Johnston and Hood. After the death of commanding officer Brig. Gen. John H. Kelly near Franklin, Tennessee, Anderson assumed temporary command of the division later resuming his position as brigade commander. He was wounded again at Fayetteville, North Carolina during the Carolinas Campaign, on March 11, 1865.Anderson would later lead his brigade against advancing Union forces, being wounded for a third time at the Battle of Griswoldville.[2] Then he joined Wheeler’s Cavalry Corps in the Carolinas Campaign before the collapse of the Confederacy in April 1865.[6] He surrendered with Johnston’s army at Hillsboro, North Carolina, surrendering to General William T. Sherman on April 26, 1865, 17 days after Lee’s surrender at Appomattox.

$650

Confederate Division Commander Edward “Old Allegheny” Johnson by Anthony

$400

Union Iron Clad Gunboat USS Essex.  Fought the CSS Arkansas outside of Vicksburg.  Rare photo.

$450

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Rare cdv of Colonel/General Henry Morrow of the famed 24th Michigan Iron Brigade who commanded them at Gettysburg.  Photographer is Ingmire of Springfield IL, when the 24th were the Honor Guard accompanying Lincoln’s body to his grave.  

$1200

Very Rare and Important large cdv of the Union Officers in command of Fort Sumter during the battle in 1861 commanded by Major Robert Anderson.  Many of these became famous Generals during the War including the following in the photograph; Capt. A. Doubleday, Major R. Anderson, Asst. Secry. S. W. Crawford, Capt. J. S. Foster. From left in back row: Capt. T. Seymour, Lt. G. W. Snyder, Lt. J. C. Davis, Lt. R. K. Meade, Capt. T. Talbot.  Very rare image but condition is bit rough as seen. 

$550

Brady view of Joseph Mower of the Army of the Cumberland, ink inscription on verso Maj Gen’ Joseph Mower 20th Army Corps”

$250

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Rare view of Halbert Paine by Jacobs NO.   In May 1861, Paine was commissioned colonel of the 4th Wisconsin Infantry (later changed to a cavalry regiment). After initial service near Baltimore, the regiment moved by sea to the Gulf of Mexico, where Paine led them in battle at New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Grand Gulf, Mississippi, during 1862. His regiment then spent time controlling occupied territory in the Lower Mississippi Valley for most of 1862 and 1863.Arrested for Protecting Slaves
On June 11, 1862, Col. Paine refused to obey an order requiring officers to return runaway slaves to their owners. He was arrested and confined at New Orleans. Two months later, his commanding general was killed at the Battle of Baton Rouge. Paine was released from prison and put in charge of the city. When ordered to burn it to the ground, he again refused to comply but avoided arrest by persuading his superiors to his point of view. When the city was evacuated, he ordered the state library moved to New Orleans for safe-keeping.Wounded
Paine was promoted to brigadier general in March 1863, and led his brigade in the assault on Port Hudson that began May 26, 1863. On June 14 Paine was in front of his troops urging them forward when he was shot from his horse. Wounded in the leg, he lay on the field under heavy fire from morning until after dark, when he was finally removed. By the time he reached doctors in New Orleans, his left leg had to be amputated.  After convalescing in Milwaukee for a month, Paine returned to service in September 1863 as a military attorney in Washington, D.C. When Confederate troops threatened the city in July 1864, Paine requested and was given command of a combat unit for a brief period. He was then assigned to home front duties and returned to Milwaukee in October 1864. He was brevetted major general of volunteers on March 13, 1865, and resigned from the army on May 3.

$350

Scarce Autograph and presented view of David G Farragut Leading Union Naval Commander during the War.  

$1000

Rare Brady Album Gallery Card of Dead Confederates Soldiers that fell on the field near the Burnside Bridge at Antietam.

$900

Brady Album Gallery Card of the Burnside Bridge at Antietam.

$600

Rare cdv of John Mosby by the Lee Gallery Richmond. 

$1500

Scarce view of August Kautz by Hoag and Quick Cincinnati. 

Kautz was a captain with the 6th U.S. Cavalry during the Peninsula Campaign from April to July 1862. Transferred to the Western Theater, Kautz later assisted in operations as a colonel with the 2nd Ohio Cavalry against Confederate General John Hunt Morgan’s raid behind Union lines in Indiana and Ohio during June–July 1863 and under the command of Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside at the Battle of Knoxville from September to December 1863.

Promoted to brigadier general of volunteers on April 16, 1864, Kautz led cavalry operations under the command of Maj. Gen. Benjamin Butler during Ulysses S. Grant’s campaigns against Richmond and Petersburg between April and June 1864. His cavalry division was a part of the Army of the James and was forced to withdraw from its position at White’s Tavern following an attack by parts of Confederate Lt. Gen. Richard H. Anderson’s Corps. On December 12, 1864, President Abraham Lincoln nominated Kautz for appointment to the brevet grade of major general of volunteers, to rank from October 28, 1864, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment on February 14, 1865.[5] He was mustered out of the volunteers on January 15, 1866.[6] On July 17, 1866, President Andrew Johnson nominated Kautz for appointment to the brevet grade of major general, U.S. Army, to rank from March 13, 1865, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment on July 23, 1866.[7]

In early April 1865, Kautz marched into Richmond in command of a division of colored troops which belonged to Godfrey Weitzel’s XXV Corps. He was active during the Union pursuit of Robert E. Lee from April 2 to April 9, 1865, until Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House.

$350

Rare cdv of General Henry Watkins Allen by Anderson NO. Civil War Confederate Brigadier General, Confederate Louisiana Governor. Henry Watkins Allen was born in Virginia. He was the son of physician Dr. Thomas Allen and Ann (Watkins) Allen. The family moved to Missouri in 1833 and he attended Marion College, in Philadelphia, Missouri for two years until he was 17. In 1837 he became a tutor on a plantation in Grand Gulf, Mississippi and after studying the law at night was admitted to the Mississippi bar in 1841. In 1842, he served in the Texas Revolution against Mexico. He married in 1844 after he returned to Mississippi. From 1845 to 1847, he served in the Mississippi House of Representatives. After his wife died in 1851, he moved to West Baton Rouge Parish and purchased a large sugar plantation which included 125 slaves. He formed a company to build a railroad from the present Port Allen to Rosedale on Bayou Gross Tete. He studied law for a year at Harvard. After failing in his 1855 effort to be elected to the state Senate of Louisiana, he went to Europe with the intention of taking part in the Italian struggle for independence, but arrived too late. He made a tour through Europe, the incidents of which he later recounted in “‘Travels of a Sugar Planter.” While in Europe, he was elected to the Louisiana House of Representatives as a member of the Know Nothing (American) party. In 1859, he transferred to the Democratic party and became floor leader. In 1860, he volunteered as a private in the Delta Rifle Company and in 1861 he helped seize the federal arsenal in Baton Rouge. In the same year, Allen founded the Louisiana Historical Society and served as the President. Before being sent to Tennessee with Beauregard in 1862, he was promoted to the rank of Colonel. He took command of the Fourth Louisiana Regiment and suffered a bullet wound in the cheek at the battle of Shiloh. He commanded a Brigade in the Battle of Baton Rouge where his leg was shattered, but he refused to have the leg amputated. But by September 1863, Allen’s direct fighting career was over as he was physically unfit for service. He served briefly as the military governor of Jackson, Mississippi. Governor Thomas G. Moore appointed Allen the rank of Major General of the Louisiana Militia but he never served. He became a Brigadier General and was sent to Shreveport where he organized the paroled prisoners of war. He was elected Confederate Governor of Louisiana and was inaugurated in 1864. After a tour of the state, he approved the free distribution of cotton cards and the free distribution of medicine. He established a system of unified currency and state-run stores for citizens to buy basic supplies at low cost and allowed people to pay with Louisiana or Confederate currency. He also established a laboratory to produce medicines and medical facilities to distribute them. Allen began to trade with Mexico. His administration’s program of cotton collection and trading defeated the Union blockade. He maintained public schools and authorized a geological survey of the state to locate needed raw materials with a mining and manufacturing bureau. Two battalions of state guard were organized which become the 8th Louisiana Cavalry Regiment. They assisted regular Confederate troops. When Governor Allen heard of General Robert E. Lee’s surrender, at first he wanted to continue fighting, but eventually he gave a farewell speech and went into exile in Mexico. While there, he edited an English language paper the “Mexico Times” and assisted in the opening of trade between Texas and Mexico. Having never fully recovered from his battle wounds, he died and was buried in the American Cemetery in Mexico city. His remains were returned to Louisiana in 1876 and placed on the grounds of the state capitol in 1885. Allen Parish, Louisiana is named for him.

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Rare cdv of an Iron Brigade member captured at Gettysburg.  Robert K Beecham of the 2nd Wisconsin Vols Iron Brigade and later in the 23rd USCT.  POW at Gettysburg and Paroled “

Robert Beecham began as a young Wisconsin private in the famed Iron Brigade who survived to see his unit cut to ribbons at Gettysburg. He then reenlisted as an officer in the newly formed U.S. Colored Troops, which he led at the battle of the Crater in 1864. Treated in Union hospitals for wounds and twice interned in Confederate prisons, Beecham lived to tell his intriguing story of Civil War army life.  What is so clear in As if it Were Glory is Beecham’s voice as an observant outspoken commentator. He is a candid critic of army bureaucracy and his own officer corps, while championing the enlisted man—white and black—of the Union army.  His memoirs were published und there title Robert Beecham’s Civil War from the Iron Brigade to the Black Regiments.  from Madison House.

$1500

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Autographed view of Henry Morris Naglee by Fredericks NY.  Signed on the verso “With Kind regards Henry M Naglee

$500

Rare autographed view of Colonel/General Stephen Miller of the famed 1st Minnesota Vols and later Governor of the State of MN by Whitney.

$800

Scarce view by Brady of Judson Kilpatrick and his wife. 

$475

General George Armstrong Custer by Goldin.

$1800

Brady Album Gallery photograph of the Bridge over the Rappahannock River in Va. 

$450

Rare Large Albumen by Gardner of General William F Barlett’s Division HQ in Va in 1864 which has been autographed by General Bartlett himself.  (see photo in next section for signature).  Bartlett who served in the 20th Mass Harvard Regiment, was Colonel of the 49th Mass and 57th Mass before becoming a General.  Very famous Officer and rarely do you see a large albumen signed like this.  Excellent Condition.

$2500

Portion of the Large albumen of General Bartlett showing the signature.   See above

$2500

Large albumen framed taken by Alexander Gardner and published by Brady of Dead Confederates lying in the Slaughter Pen area of the battlefield near Devils Den killed on July 3rd during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Rare.   (reflections from light bulb glare on the glassed image)

$1800

Exceptionally sharp 1/6 plate Tintype of a Union Sargent in a complete case.  Rarely do they come this nice.  

$450

Very Sharp Anthony view of General Lew Wallace, author of Ben Hur.

$450

Original Cabinet Card by Saroney and clipped signature as Commander of the US Army by Civil War Medal of Honor Winner and Famed Indian Wars Commander Nelson Miles.  Great combination that would look nice framed together. 

$550

Large Imperial sized Boudoir Card of Captain Tom Custer killed at the Little Big Horn along with his brother General George A Custer by Barry.  Rare

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Ultra Rare Union Document signed by 2 Killed in Actions Union Generals.  Letter about the Chaplain of the 37th NYVI looking for some leave.  Then the document is endorsed by Colonel BBG of the 37th NY Samuel Brinckle Hayman, then approved and signed by General Hiram Berry killed at Chancellorsville and lastly by the famous Phil Kearny killed at Chantilly.  Wonderful combination of very rare signatures and history.  (document on white paper did not scan well coming in bit bleached out but is a normal Union Document in appearance)

$1350

Two page ALS in the hand of Union General James Wadsworth killed in the Wilderness written in 1862 recommending a commission for a Mr Backus who was on General Whipple staff.  Dated 8/10/62.  Wadsworth one of the US’s wealthiest men owned much of Western NY at the time.  Prominent role at Gettysburg also.  

$950

1862 Manuscript order from Geneal Joseph K Mansfiled to Captain Jno Cussels 11th Pa Cavalry directing him to move his troops to Fortress Monroe during the Penninsula campaign.  Mansfield would be killed a few months later at Antietam directing the XII Corps.  Rare

$1000

Nice Vannerson and Jones Richmond view of James Longstreet.

$700

Extremely sharp and scarce view of Confederate General Roswell Ripley by Anthony. 

$500

Case for the Zouave below, no whit line exists on the case. 

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Quarter plate TT of a Union Zouave, possible 9th NY?    Case viewed above.

$950

Private Augustus F Bull of the 6th  Connecticut Infantry.  Served 9/61-9/64 seeing action at Pocatiglio SC, Fort Wagner in the famous assault, Spottsylvania CH, Drewry’s Bluff, Bermuda Hundred and Deep Bottom Run among other actions with regiment.  Period ink signature on verso.

$200

CDV of Sgt William H H Ellis 18th Connecticut Vols.  POW at Winchester 1863.  Jennings Norwich CT bm. 

$200

Autographed image of Colonel James Grant Wilson 15th Illinois Cavalry and 4th USCT Cavalry. BBG.  James Grant Wilson (April 28, 1832 – February 1, 1914) was an American editor, author, bookseller and publisher, who founded the Chicago Record in 1857, the first literary paper in that region. During the American Civil War, he served as a colonel in the Union Army. In recognition of his service, in 1867, he was nominated and confirmed for appointment as a brevet brigadier general of volunteers to rank from March 13, 1865. He settled in New York, where he edited biographies and histories, was a public speaker, and served as president of the Society of American Authors and the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society.  During the Civil War, Wilson sold his journal and entered the Union Army late in 1862. He was commissioned as a major of the 15th Illinois Cavalry, commanded the 4th U.S.C. Cavalry as colonel. He resigned from the Army on June 16, 1865.[3] On February 27, 1867, President Andrew Johnson nominated Wilson for appointment to the grade of brevet brigadier general of volunteers to rank from March 13, 1865, and the United States Senate confirmed the appointment on March 2, 1867.[4] His middle brother was killed at Fredericksburg, Virginia, and his youngest brother also served.  By Jacobs NO. 

$400

Spectacular Patriotic cover and 4 page letter from Mass Sharpshooter Edwin J Herring to his Sister.  Served 10/61-3/63 as the company of SS’s were attached to the 22nd Mass Vols.  Some better commentary;  Left Alexandria on the steamship Daniel Webster, arrived Fortress Monroe..went out on a scout with the whole regiment and saw a few horse cavalry, the rebels left before we could get close…troops went before us this morning with artillery,  we are as black as niggers…talks about places burned by the Rebels among other things.  4 well written pages on patriotic stationary.  

$300

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